IMAGE OF THE WEEK 2012

WEEK 29

 

Schizencephaly

 

 

Figure 1: CT scan of the brain showing lost of brain tissue on the right temporal region.

(Click on image to enlarge)

Figure 2: CT scan of the brain at a lower level showing lost of brain tissue on the right temporal region.

(Click on image to enlarge)

Figure 3: Coronal plane of the head on CT scan showing lost of brain tissue on the right temporal region.

(Click on image to enlarge)

 

 

 

Schizencephaly is an uncommon cortical malformation that manifests as a grey matter-lined cleft in the brain parenchyma extending from the ependyma to the pia mater.  It is sporadic, with literally a handful of cases in a country the size of Brunei.  Although not confirmed it is believed to be a result of an in utero insult, disturbing normal neuronal migration.

 

Schizencephaly may be OPEN or CLOSED lip in nature.  In the open lip form the cleft is widely opened (LARGE) and occupied with CSF.  In closed lip the cleft is narrow (SMALL) essentially opposed.

 

MRI is by far the best imaging modality to assess the cleft, identify the heterotopic grey matter and also any associated abnormalities, such as optic nerve dysplasia, callosal a/dysgenesis or focal cortical dysplasia.

 

Images and text contributed and prepared by

Dr Ian Bickle, Department of Radiology.

All images are copyrighted and property of RIPAS Hospital.

 

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